Scythe by Neal Shusterman

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In a future in which humanity has conquered death, population control is of the utmost importance. A Scythe’s duty is to glean humans, killing them, and thus maintaining the population balance. A Scythe can live forever, but, tasked with the most gruesome of responsibilities, would they want to? Citra and Rowan are chosen to be apprentices to the esteemed Scythe Faraday. Though neither truly wants the job, the possible benefits of the position are too good to pass up. However, throughout the course of their training, the two apprentices find that there is more lurking within the shadows of scythedom than they realized. Citra and Rowan must solve a life or death mystery, or risk losing their own lives in the aftermath.

This is the best book I’ve read in SO LONG. The premise itself is incredible. I could truly see a world in which humanity conquers disease/death, so population control might actually be an issue. Shusterman brings his typical creative writing to weave a complex mystery, complete a variety of twists and turns. If you’re looking for your next sci-fi addiction, this is it!

*YALSA Best Books For Young Adults, 2017

Rating: 5/5

 

 

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Challenger Deep Full Analysis

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Caden has an average teenage life — parents, a sister, friends, sports, school. Though everything appears normal for Caden, behaviors usually dismissed as personality quirks begin to take over his life. He quits the track team to take secret walks for hours, can no longer focus on his daily activities, and is convinced that bad things are about to happen. In his mind, Caden is a crew member serving an unpredictable, vicious captain set to turn Caden into his slave. With each passing day, the line between fantasy and reality is blurred, sending Caden further into his abyss of mental illness.

This book was just wow. I honestly don’t think I’ve read anything like it. Shusterman uses incredible style to illustrate Caden’s mental illness, including symbolism echoed in both Caden’s real life and in the world he believes is real. Though it can be tough to understand at times, this book talks about a very important issue that many would prefer is kept quiet. As Caden says in the book, “Dead kids are put on pedestals; mentally ill kids are swept under the rug”. It’s time to stop ignoring or shaming others because of circumstances beyond their control. The more we talk about this issue, the better it gets. I fully expect Shusterman to win all the awards for this!

Rating: 5/5 

For full analysis (including flags and SPOILERS) click here.